Why does photorealism matter

Photorealism artworks - Argato.de

What photorealism is can already be deduced from the word itself: It is a form of painting in which the objects depicted should appear as lifelike as if they had been photographed. But it is precisely this ambition that completely contradicts the actual definition of art. According to her, a work should reflect the feelings and thoughts of its creator or be a way of communicating to the viewer. Numerous critics accuse photorealism of failing to live up to this claim. But are the results less artistic than works of other styles or genres? As is so often the case, that depends on how you look at it. Because art is not only a means of expression, but also a skill that has become visible. Indeed, one of the characteristics of photorealism is that the performing artists develop virtuosity and technical mastery. In order to deepen them, they are often limited to very specific topics, the illustration of which they finally master to perfection. Examples of such a focused painting are the oversized portraits by Chuck Close and the reflective shop window fronts by Richard Estes.

 

Features of photorealism

Works like this draw attention to other peculiarities of photorealism. The objects are presented as naturally and as realistically as possible. Every detail has the same value and is included in the picture accordingly. It is not the artist's subjective perception that counts, but only reality - including all physical laws. In photorealism there are neither shifts in perspective nor alienated colors. In addition, the painter only depicts what the viewer can or could see in the original. He consciously moves away from surreal, abstract or fantastic representations. An approach that explains how photorealism came about. It is a direct reaction to the Expressionism practiced to date - and closely related to Pop Art. In contrast to their flat representation and the clear colors used for them, photo realists only work with natural-looking tones and real perspectives. To do this, they used photographic templates such as slides, which they transferred onto the canvas to be painted with the help of projectors and the grid method. Nevertheless, the works of photorealism are not a mere reflection of reality. Some artists show quite effective changes in the scale or the guidance of the brush. Others consciously turned to technical challenges such as the depiction of certain materials. One example of this are the flashing chrome parts that David Parrish addresses in his "Motorcycles" series. Still others pursued photorealism to perfection. So page: 1 of 2 there is hardly any evidence of style in Robert Bechtle's paintings; his numerous car pictures actually look like photographs.

 

Representative of photorealism

The artists of photorealism found their first public platform in New York's "Whitney Museum of American Art", which in 1970 dedicated an exhibition to the new style. However, the young art movement did not achieve its international breakthrough until two years later: at "documenta 5" in Kassel, the unusual paintings drew numerous visitors under their spell. They were both impressed and confused by the real-looking images - an effect that photo-realism images achieve to this day. They abduct their viewers on the fine line between photography and painting, where they act like a link between two genres.

Current works of art

Bent architecture

What photorealism is can already be deduced from the word itself: It is a form of painting in which the objects depicted should appear as lifelike as if they had been photographed. But it is precisely this ambition that completely contradicts the actual definition of art. According to her, a work should reflect the feelings and thoughts of its creator or be a way of communicating to the viewer. Numerous critics accuse photorealism of failing to live up to this claim. But are the results less artistic than works of other styles or genres? As is so often the case, that depends on how you look at it. Because art is not only a means of expression, but also a skill that has become visible. Indeed, one of the characteristics of photorealism is that the performing artists develop virtuosity and technical mastery. In order to deepen them, they often limit themselves to very specific topics, which they ultimately master to perfection. Examples of such a focused painting are the oversized portraits by Chuck Close and the reflective shop window fronts by Richard Estes.

 

Features of photorealism

Works like this draw attention to other peculiarities of photorealism. The objects are presented as naturally and as realistically as possible. Every detail has the same value and is included in the picture accordingly. It is not the artist's subjective perception that counts, but only reality - including all physical laws. In photorealism there are neither shifts in perspective nor alienated colors. In addition, the painter only depicts what the viewer can or could see in the original. He consciously moves away from surreal, abstract or fantastic representations. An approach that explains how photorealism came about. It is a direct reaction to the Expressionism practiced to date - and closely related to Pop Art. In contrast to their flat representation and the clear colors used for them, photo realists only work with natural-looking tones and real perspectives. To do this, they used photographic templates such as slides, which they transferred onto the canvas to be painted with the help of projectors and the grid method. Nevertheless, the works of photorealism are not a mere reflection of reality. Some artists show quite effective changes in the scale or the guidance of the brush. Others consciously turned to technical challenges such as the depiction of certain materials. One example of this are the flashing chrome parts that David Parrish addresses in his "Motorcycles" series. Still others pursued photorealism to perfection. So page: 1 of 2, almost no style can be detected in Robert Bechtle's paintings; his numerous car pictures actually look like photographs.

 

Representative of photorealism

The artists of photorealism found their first public platform in New York's "Whitney Museum of American Art", which in 1970 dedicated an exhibition to the new style. However, the young art movement did not achieve its international breakthrough until two years later: at "documenta 5" in Kassel, the unusual paintings drew numerous visitors under their spell. They were just as impressed as they were confused by the real-looking images - an effect that the images of photorealism achieve to this day. They abduct their viewers on the fine line between photography and painting, where they act like a link between two genres.

Current works of art

Bent architecture