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Kabir

Kabir found himself singing

The verses of the Indian Bhakti poet and mystic
Yin Yang Media Verlag, Kelkheim 2006
ISBN 9783935727112
Paperback, 154 pages, EUR 12.50

Blurb

Edited and translated from Hindi by Shubhra Parashar. Kabir, a simple weaver from the second half of the 15th century, is one of India's greatest mystics and poets. He belonged to the north Indian Bhakti movement, which renounced the strict ceremonial of the Brahmin priests and did not allow any caste differences to apply. The Bhakti followers sought direct access to the divine through personal and loving devotion. Kabir is shaped by Hinduism and the mystical tradition of Islam (Sufism). He left behind all religious boundaries, regulations and theologies. In the mystical becoming one with the divine, he found God in himself and in all beings. His verses, ecstatic love poems, songs of mockery against narrow-minded pious letters, short instructions in the form of two lines have only one goal: in a very direct language, his audience for their own encounter to lead with God.

Review note for the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, December 20, 2006

"Kabir found himself in the song". Verses of the Indian poet and mystic The reviewer Martin Kämpchen is pleased that the Indian mystic Kabir is introduced to the German readership with this publication. His approach of talking about religion and repeatedly meeting all concrete ideas about God with "steadfast transcendence" is, according to the reviewer, as "fresh and necessary" today as it was in the 16th century. Kämchen praises the fact that his thinking is presented to us as "comprehensive and pleasantly simple". Even if the accompanying explanations are kept brief, everything that matters is included.
Read the review at buecher.de

Review note for the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, December 20, 2006

The reviewer Martin Kämpchen is pleased that this publication introduces the Indian mystic Kabir to the German readership. His approach of talking about religion and repeatedly meeting all concrete ideas about God with "steadfast transcendence" is, in the opinion of the reviewer, as "fresh and necessary" today as it was in the 16th century. Kämchen praises the fact that his thinking is presented to us as "comprehensive and pleasantly simple". Even if the accompanying explanations are kept brief, everything that matters is included.
Read the review at buecher.de